Friday, May 18, 2018

Titanic Era Dress











From the seller:

Vintage Edwardian Blue Chiffon Silk Hand Stitched Embroidered Panel LS Dress XS

This amazing vintage Edwardian aqua blue chiffon silk long sleeve dress has a hand stitched and embroidered front panel snap over bib and bottom. It has a left side hook and snap closure and is silk lined.

This dress is very delicate!

Estimated Size XS

Approx Measurements:

Shoulder to Shoulder - 15"
Shoulder Seam to Cuff - 21"
Underarm to Cuff - 16"
Chest - 32"
Waist - 26"
Length - 52"

This dress is very fragile and needs some TLC
It has been re worked under the arms and has slight staining
Fabric is torn in many places, especially shoulder due to hanging
In Otherwise Excellent to Near Mint Condition


From Me:
1912 Fashion Plate

The long pencil skirt with a bit of "fluff" in the bodice, were very popular from about 1910 until 1913.  This extant beauty has the dog leg closure and some rather fabulous embroidery. 


Thursday, May 3, 2018

1830's Riding Habit Waistcoat (?)


From the seller:



picture
Victorian Women's French Toile Blue Print Linen Double Breasted Waistcoat Vest

1860-1960 One hundred years of fashion & accessories
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This antique Victorian era women's French toile blue print linen double breasted waistcoat vest dates from the late 19th century. It is made of an off white, blue French Toile de Jouy floral botanical print linen fabric, with a grayish blue trim edging. There is an off white cotton linen fabric backing and inside lining. This wonderful women's waistcoat vest has a late 18th century gentlemens French waistcoat style which is longer in the front with peplum skirted panels, faux pockets, a fitted waist, fold over collar and is double breasted with matching fabric covered buttons for closure on the front. The vest measures 25 inches long in the front, 15 inches long in the back, with a 36 inch bust and 24 inch waist. It is in good as-is condition, with a few faint small stains, some fraying along the blue trim edging and a small frayed hole on the bottom front panel (see close-ups). This is truly a rare and unique piece of womens wearable antique Victoriana!



From Me:
UGH! Ignoring the "wearable" part for now - this isn't even Victorian. Oh yes, at first blush, it looks like it could be 1870's but look at the way the shoulders are cut. Look at how high the waistline is in the back. Also check out the close up of the fraying - the twill is handstitched on!

Then there is the fabric itself...that's what the big clue was. Yes, fabric is often reused but look:

1825 Fabric from the Winterthur Museum

1830s print from the Spencer Museum of Art via Barbara Brackman's Blog

1825-1830 via Utah Quilt Appraiser


Okay, so the fabric is from the 1820s/1830s but we see fabric reused all the time. Going back to the cut, I looked up riding habits of the time and was not disappointed.


The above 1830's Riding habit hints at the waistcoat underneath but I wanted to see if there was one that showed a similar waistcoat.
1836/7 fashion plate from the V&A

Although the back of the blue riding habit has the same lines as the back of the waistcoat, there aren't any easily visible waistcoats on the ladies. However, all the men do have the double breasted style very similar to this extant one.

There aren't any fashion plates from the 1830's that show a riding habit with a waistcoat (the funny thing is that you see them in both the 1820's and the 1840's) but the cut, particularly at the shoulders, is so very 1830's, that the latest I'd put this is about 1842.

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Post American Civil War Bodice









From the seller:


This Civil War bodice is made from an iridescent green silk taffeta. It has pretty cord covered buttons and is trimmed with emerald green satin piping. It's lined in brown cotton and has light boning. It has dropped shoulders with piping around the armhole seams. It has some green spots and the tulle ruffle around the wrists should be removed, very, very small, light under arm fade under one arm, but overall excellent. It measures 33 inches around the bust, waist is 23, across the back shoulder is 13 and is 15 inches long. The name Ristine is printed on the back neck.





From Me:


1868 Fashion Plate


My guess is this bodice might even be a bit earlier than the fashion plate but it's post American Civil War either way. The shortness of the bodice gives that away as well as the trim lines - which just came into fashion as the Civil War was ending.

Thursday, March 22, 2018

Turn of the Century Dress and Dolman!









From the seller:

ANTIQUE/VINTAGE 1890'S DRESS AND CAPE. AS YOU SEE IN THE PICTURES IT NEEDS RESTORED. WELL WORTH THE TIME.


From Me:

1899 Fashion Plate

I wanted to include this fashion plate because the sleeves are similar - it has a bit of the flare of the extant gown at the cuff but, really, the almost extinct puff at the armscye is still there.

What I love about this is that it's probably for a slightly older lady who wanted the fashions of ten years ago but to still look fashionable in the very late 1890's as well. The dolman went out of style in the late 1880's but this one is cut to the cape like fashion of the turn of the century. 

Overall, it's a pretty fun outfit. 

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Grad School is OVER!!!!!!!!!!1

To celebrate finally FINALLY being able to do something other than wake up, go to work, sit in front of a computer, come home, sit in front of the laptop, go to bed, repeat - I went to Ireland.   :-)   On Saint Patrick's Day weekend.  Because if there is anything I need after this semester, it's a good drink and good music.   Ireland, thankfully, has both!

While in Dublin on Monday, I saw that one of the lesser known museums, the Little Museum of Dublin had a fashion display going on.  It was on Irish fashion designers of the 1950's through the 1970's.  Although that's later than I'd normally do on this blog, I figured it would be an excellent gateway back into actually blogging - and not writing 20 page papers on malware.


The museum is all about Ireland's transformation in the 20th Century.   It goes through Ireland's time as a part of the UK, the Easter Rebellion, and the Troubles with a focus on the earlier 20th century.   However, the exhibit "Ireland's Fashion Radicals" goes into the emerging fashion designs from the post War era.
   
This lovely 1950's suit is the first garment to greet you into the exhibit.  I'm sorry I didn't get all the names of the designers - me being me, I was more fascinated by the cuts and the weaves of the garments.   This gingham blue outfit has a lovely waistcoat, blazer, and narrow skirt for the era.  
Back of the same outfit.  Notice the center seam
Really, there were a lot of 1960's outfits in the exhibit but I loved this coat!   The orange ties at the sides are pretty simple but the off center opening was VERY popular in the 1960's.  I also just love the bright, sunny color.
To me, this other coat looks drab in comparison
See?  Ties!!!   Okay, you can also see the seam lines which I was attempting to get a good photo off.  There is a breast dart/cut along the princess like seams on the sides of the coat to give it a nice shape overall.  Still...TIES!!!
All these garments were also 1950's and 1960's.  The red skirt is quilted but it's the gray skirt and shirt I fell in love with.  
Close up of the quilting
1960 House Dress by Sybil Connelly
The point at which I realized "I might want to remember some of the designer names"
Close up of the embroidery and lace details on the gray skirt.  The center medallions are lace and the embroidery weaves back and forth around them.  
Close up of the blouse that was paired with the gray skirt.
Close up of the bottom of the embroidery on the gray skirt.  Did I mention how much I love this?

Next was the exhibit case.  Inside were examples of tweed, string, and fabric swatches.  I guess they kept it locked up because Ireland heard I was coming and I would play with the fibers....

Then there were the ball gowns.  The red one I really liked because it was so weird.   It took some elements of the 1930's and put them on a late 1940's gown.  It laces up the front and has those crazy ruffled sleeves.   It was one of the more interesting pieces.  
Really, this is the front of the gown.  I double checked.
Close up of the sleeve detail
Waistline and pleat detail.  The skirt is separate as you can see the waistband under the bodice.
Close up of the hem of the red dress from 1948.
The other two dresses.  The gray and gold was lovely but pretty typical for 1950's evening fashion.  The black and blue had a lovely floral embroidery detail all over the skirt.
Floral embroidery
Back of the black and blue gown
Bodice of the black and blue gown
It's the pleats that really make this dress special and different from most 1950's evening gown designs.  
All three evening gowns were designed by Irene Gilbert.
This dress was interesting.   It reminds me of the later 1970's "prairie" styles but it's still clearly late 1960's.   The skirt looked very harsh and heavy even in person but the bodice seemed lighter even though both were clearly the same material.
Close up of the bodice.
Bodice Back

The second half of the room was pretty much devoted to the late 1960's/into the 1970's.   The leftmost floral dress?  I LOVE it.   Wait until you see the close ups of that beauty.   
One of the many exhibit photos on the walls.
Late 1960's outfit.  What was interesting about this one is the sleeves.  They fall at 3/4 length but are actually open at the elbow down.
Close up of the embroidery on the jacket.
Close up of the sleeve
Behold!  The fur of the marabou!  :-)   Pretty standard late 1960's/early 1970's evening gown.  Really, this almost looks like something that would have been worn on the original Star Trek.  Still, I really love the elongated sleeves and the flow of the material.  Wait until you see the back of this gown.  
Cuff detail
This was so completely amazing to behold.  Pictures don't do it justice.   The fabric appears to be painted and the various cuts of the fabric make you realize this isn't as simple as it looks at first.  
Curved cut to a v-front on the upper bust of the gown.
Zipper and back curved cut
Sleeve and slanted cut along the hip towards the middle front and back
Dropped v-cut in the center front
Pretty normal 1970's tweed coat except for the fabulous book of kells inspired patterns
Close up of the patterns
Maxi skirt time!   Okay, so I'm a sucker for pink and green together.  Really, green and pretty much every other color.   Green is not my favorite color but I love it paired with other colors.  
The mid-drift top appears to be crocheted.  There weren't any visible seams.
The maxi skirt consisted of a patchwork of green and pink cotton (?) with pink and green ribbons, run through lace, covering the seams.
Close up of the back shoulder of the mid-drift top
Back of the maxi skirt
There was no good way to get a good photo of this outfit due to the lighting.  The maxi skirt is a lighter purple with faded pink and black flowers.
It's the top that really makes this outfit.   The crochet on this was just fabulous.
Close up of the maxi skirt embroidery.
The back of the outfit.  Ignore the color - I was trying to get a good detail of the back buttons on the blouse.  Thankfully, that came out!
1980's cocktail dress.
1970's knitted garments.   There is a part of me that loves the pink knit pants and there is a far greater part of me that hopes this is never in style again.
Crop top in purple
Knitted striped tunic with matching knit pants
Sparkly pink knit pants
Okay, I've got admit the basketweave knit is pretty cool but....ugh....
Back of the striped knit tunic
I admit, I'd probably wear the purple crop top if I thought I could get away with it.  I love the pearl button detail!
And back to the fur of the marabou!!!!  (Yes, I know it's feathers)   The back of the dress is way more interesting than the front.   The dipped back with the gathers must have made this seem airy as it moved.  
I realized I didn't get a good photo of the back of the red suit at the start of the exhibit.  
The seams on the jacket and the skirt match.  That alone takes talent.
The nice thing about this late 1950's/early 1960's swing coat is the back detail.  It's very similar to some late 16th Century designs.  
More on the airy burgundy dress - I wanted to show the piecing.
...And that even the exhibitors couldn't zip it up...


I hope everyone enjoyed the photos!   I know it's a lot later than I'd normally share and also breaks the no museum rule but this was such an interesting exhibit that I thought everyone might want to see some of the garments.  Plus, grad school is over - I'm breaking all the rules!!!!