Tuesday, July 15, 2014

1920's Lavender Nautical Dress












From the seller:


This is a darling 1920s sailor dress in an unusual color - lavender, or orchid (so current!). It's actually two pieces - there is an under dress, like a slip dress, and an over blouse. It's made of a medium weight woven cotton fabric. It's embellished with embroidered wool patches. The patches feature nautical themes - a sailor's knot, eagle, anchor & stripes. It's in great condition for it's age. There are only a few imperfections - some light spotting on the front of the skirt, some breaks in the white top stitching thread on the shoulders, and some discoloration under the arms of the under dress. See pictures.

Great for a Downton Abbey theme party!

Measurements -

DRESS

Bust - 35"
Hip - 42"
Length - 38"

BLOUSE

Bust - 44"
Width - 46"
Length - 23" from shoulder
Sleeves - 31" from center of nape of neck



From Me:

YAY! 200 members for this blog. Thank you all!


Now, I want to make a dress exactly like this - same color and everything- and call it my purple pirate dress. I'd wear a purple velvet eyepatch too! :-) Oh, come on! It would make the most awesome Downton Abbey/Boardwalk Empire/Insert Favorite 1920's Movie or show here inspired Halloween outfit ever.

5 comments:

  1. O. M. G. I want this so much!! I've always loved sailor collars, and the color is lovely. This is just so charming and unique!

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    Replies
    1. Isn't it the cutest? Maybe we should all make a variation on it and either be all purple pirates from the 20th century or everyone choose a different pastel. :-)

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  2. OMG, I want to make one like this, too! I've been poking around looking at 1920's middy blouses forever, and I think a bodiced skirt is a great idea for the 1920's look but without the fitting issues for those of us who are, uh, curvier. Pleats never work on curvy bodies, but the bodice would avoid that.

    That looks like a drop-shoulder blouse to me[?]. Hmmm.

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    Replies
    1. I think the dress form is just set a couple of sizes smaller than the dress itself to prevent any issues - the shoulders are only an inch off it looks like in the pictures.

      For 1920's fitting, I've found not only to the proper undergarments work, but if you add some curve to the back side seam, it helps a lot. Not a huge amount, but just a small tuck at the waistline on the back torso part of the pattern will help to get the 1920's look and look good on those of us who don't have the figure of a 12 year old boy. :-)

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    2. More middy images here (1924 Sears catalog page).

      McCall 8696 (early 1920's, looks like? Very early packet design), from somewhere on Pinterest.

      Butterick 1778 (1910's? This one looks a little earlier to me), another (child's) middy with bodiced skirt. She doesn't show the back of the packet, though.

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