Thursday, September 12, 2013

18th Century Jacket!












From the seller:

An early 18th century satin brocade Caraco bodice. The fabric has a red and ivory floral pattern on a blue background. The bodice is all hand stitched. The front of the bodice has hand stitched eye holes for lacing. There are remnants of pink silk trim on the sleeve cuffs and decorative buttons. The neckline, sleeve cuffs and hemline are edged with ivory silk ribbon. The bodice is lined with linen. There is wear at the bend of the elbow and missing fabric at one elbow. There are a couple of dime size holes and There are splits on one side of the hemline and on the back tails. This is a great piece for pattern or for studying how clothes were made during the 18th century. Bust 30 Waist 24.

From Me:

I have been staring at this for a good 20 minutes and I'm still not sure when it's from, exactly. 1730's...not with those cuffs. 1780's? Would explain why it looks like a hack job. 1870's? Fabric is clearly 18th Century but the styling makes sense now...

So, this originally was a...something, in the 18th C (probably 1740's/1750's based on the fabric) that got remade in the Bustle Era. This, unfortunately, was common. It's why we have so few extant garments from the Renaissance (if you look at photos of Victorian fancy dress, you will almost always see an extant gown or two in the mix. The one green sleeve we have from an Elizabethan gown is only because someone in the Victorian era took the rest of the gown to be used for a fancy dress party. *headdesk* This is why we don't wear antique garments - they get destroyed and future generations can't enjoy them or learn from them.)

I'm putting this in the 1740's for now but know it's been remade.

2 comments:

  1. Ah-ha! That explains why I found it so puzzling. The basque screamed 1870s. Fancy dress strikes again.

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    Replies
    1. Yeap! Bustle era destroyed another garment.

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