Thursday, February 28, 2013

American Civil War Era Wedding Gown





From the seller:
A sweeping original circa 1862 ivory silk faille two piece gown with a 1970 museum accession numbered tag that states this was an 1862 wedding gown but without the bride's name. This lovely ensemble has a boned and stayed bodice with fashionable deep hem points, and piped at the neckline, armscyes and waistband. A pleated tulle bertha accented with silk velvet ribbons that repeat on the short sleeves, with a pleated tulle modesty insert above, and a lace up closure at the back. The sweeping skirt has a crinoline lining, with a beautiful double box pleated waistband, a back hook and eye closure, and a turned hem. Shown over a hoop skirt that is not included. A 30" bust, 24" waist, and 50" from top to hem. In sound as found condition, properly stored, with very light perspiration, most to the armscyes, a split along the seam of one armscye, some tiny age flaws to the tulle, an adjustment to the side seams that was done when the gown was made, minor wear to the waistband, a few scattered organic spots, some small age flaws, and splits at the crease of the skirt's hem from normal use in the period as Wedding gowns were often reused for other special occassions. All is reflected in the reserve price for this original Civil War era gown.

From Me:

Too bad we don't have the bride's name anymore. I'm sure the original museum paperwork had it.

2 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. It is pretty neat. ;-) I was rather struck by the simplicity of it - which is what you would expect during the war. My guess is that the tulle was reused from an early gown (1840's?) and added to the simple lines of this one. Normally, in the fashion plates at least, you see more lace/ruffles/ect at the hem for this style.

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